Hyperledger Fabric

Hyperledger Fabric is an open source blockchain protocol custom designed for enterprise use cases in a permissioned blockchain network.
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As part of the Hyperledger project of the Linux Foundation, Fabric is the most widely used blockchain protocol in the umbrella project with the widest overall community participation.

Fabric stands as a top-level protocol configuration on Kaleido, allowing users to experience the same ease of use within the console UI, while also optionally leveraging the platform’s core administrative REST API layer.


As part of the Hyperledger project of the Linux Foundation, Fabric is the most widely used blockchain protocol in the umbrella project with the widest overall community participation.

Fabric stands as a top-level protocol configuration on Kaleido, allowing users to experience the same ease of use within the console UI, while also optionally leveraging the platform’s core administrative REST API layer.


Features

Chaincode Management

Fabric Chaincodes are compatible with Kaleido’s existing smart contract management system.  This provides a streamlined, code-free path for promoting, committing and instantiating your business logic with just a few clicks or API calls.

Channel Orchestration

Every Kaleido environment contains a ready-to-use global channel with the abstracted onboarding of all memberships’ peers and orderers. Custom channels can also be created by using the console or API to define the participating memberships. Kaleido handles all of the complex configurations and orchestration behind the scenes.

Blockchain Explorer

Every Fabric peer node contains its own dedicated Blockchain Explorer view. This allows admin users to easily visualize important environment and channel details such as blocks, transaction information, peer nodes, chaincodes and more.

How it works

When contrasted against other enterprise blockchain protocols, Fabric displays a number of inherently unique characteristics.  These include - transaction lifecycle + consensus, privacy techniques + channels, trust models, smart contracts and programming paradigms.  

Trust Model - Fabric employs an elaborate governance model backed by x.509 certificates (referred to as Membership Service Provider credentials) that is coupled with policy mandates responsible for enforcing a signature threshold.

Transaction Lifecycle - Fabric transactions can be distilled into three distinct tiers:  Endorsement - execution of the target business logic and subsequent collection of signatures by the submitting client.  Ordering - deterministic global ordering per channel and assembly of transactions into blocks.  Committing - validation of received transactions as successful or failed, and subsequent commitment to their channel ledger.

Privacy Techniques - Channels provide the first high level of privacy in Fabric.  Only memberships that have been authorized to participate in a channel can join a peer node.  The accompanying ledger and underlying state information remains completely isolated from every other member on the network.  Fabric also supports Private Data Collections whereby private information is shared directly via P2P amongst the privy participants.  Only hashes of the private inputs are shared with the orderers for inclusion in the on-chain transaction.

Smart Contracts - Fabric chaincodes can be deployed either as long-running microservices, or as commands that get executed and exited when done.  A chaincode deployment is defined twofold: the executable program, which must be installed on each peer node that requires interaction with the logic or state, and the definition, which must go through the approve/commit lifecycle and is captured on-chain via transactions.

Programming Model - Chaincode supports development in Golang, Node.js and Java.  Network interactions with the peer and orderer nodes takes place over a well defined, but very complex, gRPC interface with protobuf as the wire protocol. Using one of the SDKs (supported in Golang, node.js/typescript and Java) is a necessity.


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When contrasted against other enterprise blockchain protocols, Fabric displays a number of inherently unique characteristics.  These include - transaction lifecycle + consensus, privacy techniques + channels, trust models, smart contracts and programming paradigms.  

Trust Model - Fabric employs an elaborate governance model backed by x.509 certificates (referred to as Membership Service Provider credentials) that is coupled with policy mandates responsible for enforcing a signature threshold.

Transaction Lifecycle - Fabric transactions can be distilled into three distinct tiers:  Endorsement - execution of the target business logic and subsequent collection of signatures by the submitting client.  Ordering - deterministic global ordering per channel and assembly of transactions into blocks.  Committing - validation of received transactions as successful or failed, and subsequent commitment to their channel ledger.

Privacy Techniques - Channels provide the first high level of privacy in Fabric.  Only memberships that have been authorized to participate in a channel can join a peer node.  The accompanying ledger and underlying state information remains completely isolated from every other member on the network.  Fabric also supports Private Data Collections whereby private information is shared directly via P2P amongst the privy participants.  Only hashes of the private inputs are shared with the orderers for inclusion in the on-chain transaction.

Smart Contracts - Fabric chaincodes can be deployed either as long-running microservices, or as commands that get executed and exited when done.  A chaincode deployment is defined twofold: the executable program, which must be installed on each peer node that requires interaction with the logic or state, and the definition, which must go through the approve/commit lifecycle and is captured on-chain via transactions.

Programming Model - Chaincode supports development in Golang, Node.js and Java.  Network interactions with the peer and orderer nodes takes place over a well defined, but very complex, gRPC interface with protobuf as the wire protocol. Using one of the SDKs (supported in Golang, node.js/typescript and Java) is a necessity.


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